A tool or two that helped me get passed perfectionism and vision burnout.

By Thomas Cornish Some are consumed with the vision and the bigger picture; some are hampered by a continual striving for unobtainable perfection. Both strategies often leave their hosts without having achieved what they set out to do. Predominantly attending toward the vision has its benefits. For instance, it provides us with meaning and a … Continue reading A tool or two that helped me get passed perfectionism and vision burnout.

Extraverts exhibit greater error signals to reward prediction violations.

We all have those friends who are gregarious, confident and who seem to have an ability to attract conversation. Personality psychology would find that these tendencies (i.e. to be social and outgoing) all correlate and share an underlying relationship: that of belonging to the domain trait, extraversion. Recent neuroscientific study has begun to tie the … Continue reading Extraverts exhibit greater error signals to reward prediction violations.

Patel’s points-based illusion

Mr Johnson’s conservatives have had a busy couple of weeks, which ended in an immigration related crescendo. The Home Secretary, Priti Patel, introduced the government’s plans to enact a points-based immigration system following the end of the Brexit transition period. The system proposes that a potential immigrant must first obtain 70 points before being able … Continue reading Patel’s points-based illusion

Neverwhere by Neil Gaiman: review

Neverwhere follows an awkward, shy and, during the beginning of the novel, infuriatingly agreeable Richard Mayhew: A Scot turned superficial Londoner. The reader walks into the story with Richard living, essentially, a mundane life. He has Fiancée, Jessica, as well as an office job and a few laddish friends. He feigns contentment with his predicament … Continue reading Neverwhere by Neil Gaiman: review